In Good Company

ASTD just put out an article on the applicability of games to innovation and learning by Pat Galagan.

astd-sbl

I was fortunate enough to be interviewed for the piece….even more so when the only others interviewed were John Seely Brown and Clark Aldrich….two gents who I really respect and admire.

A few excerpts follow:

    Good performers have what Tony O’Driscoll, a professor at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, calls “reputational capital.” “What you have accomplished and how your performance has been assessed by other players is open for all to see.” Capability is so transparent that players cannot fake their skills.

    Preparing for and executing raids is a popular activity in WoW. After each raid, the spoils—such as captured weapons and clothing and other virtual trophies—are divvied up immediately. “There’s a tight link between accomplishment of activity and remuneration for it,” says O’Driscoll, referring to part of the game environment that drives engagement and performance.

    Tony O’Driscoll believes that multiplayer role-playing games are a rough proxy for the work environment that lies ahead and that they offer clues to leadership in the future. Certain of their characteristics, such as nonmonetary performance incentives, data that can be seen by all, and temporary leadership roles that allow practice leading to mastery, could be important in organizations of the future.

    “The enterprise of the future will be small, global, knowledge-driven, and dependent on web-enabled partnerships. Such organizations require a different kind of leadership,” O’Driscoll says. In the MMORPG world, leadership is a task, not an identity.

You can check out the full article here.

Or print the PDF from here.

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The Play Element of Learning Leadership

Last Month I had the opportunity to participate in this wonderful symposium organized by University of Utrecht and IBM. Here is the conference agenda. Great line up of speakers.

It was a mixed reality event. There were participants physically co-located in Amsterdam and The Eduverse Foundation hosted a simultaneous event in SL. To do this show I was in my office in Durham on Skype with another machine open to the SL venue. It was a lot of fun but definitely demanded every ounce of attention I could muster to manage the various media streams. A Digital Native I am not ; )

You can check out videos of all the symposium talks here. Chuck Hamilton from IBM also spoke and I would also like to draw your attention to David Williamson Shafer’s talk where he brings up some very good points about the need for game design at the epistemic level as opposed to simply working at the skill and knowledge level.

HBR: Leadership’s Online Labs

I was in the Houston Airport today and saw that the May edition of HBR has finally hit the stands.

Byron Reeves, Tom Malone and I have an article in the issue that talks about two research projects we conducted looking at the application of Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) and their application to Leadership. I have talked a lot about his research in previous blog posts that you can read here.

This is a big day for those of us who study learning, leadership and virtual world technologies ; )

A very well respected business journal talking about gaming and learning. I must say that I am very proud to have been part of this effort. On that note, credit is due to a number of folks who made this article happen. This research could not have happened without the foresight of David Yaun, VP of Communicaitons at IBM who leads the GIO project among other key innovation initiatives. Furthermore, beyond David’s insight, without the ongoing support and guidance from Kris Lichter, Director of the GIO program, it would never have been realized. Finally, when it came to the running the internal survey with IBMers who were also gamers my colleagues Eric Lesser and Michael DeMarco were instrumental in driving this work to completion.

18 months ago I shared with Tom Stewart the research we were doing and suggested that HBR readers might find it of interest. He put us in touch with Paul Hemp who was wonderful in helping take our research and helping us craft it into a piece worthy of publishing in HBR.

Today, a year and a half later, I see the article in glorious technicolor print in Houston. It has been a long journey, kinda like getting to level 70 in WoW, but we made it!

Thanks to all. Publishing in HBR truly is a collaborative, co-creative sport!