HBR: Leadership’s Online Labs

I was in the Houston Airport today and saw that the May edition of HBR has finally hit the stands.

Byron Reeves, Tom Malone and I have an article in the issue that talks about two research projects we conducted looking at the application of Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) and their application to Leadership. I have talked a lot about his research in previous blog posts that you can read here.

This is a big day for those of us who study learning, leadership and virtual world technologies ; )

A very well respected business journal talking about gaming and learning. I must say that I am very proud to have been part of this effort. On that note, credit is due to a number of folks who made this article happen. This research could not have happened without the foresight of David Yaun, VP of Communicaitons at IBM who leads the GIO project among other key innovation initiatives. Furthermore, beyond David’s insight, without the ongoing support and guidance from Kris Lichter, Director of the GIO program, it would never have been realized. Finally, when it came to the running the internal survey with IBMers who were also gamers my colleagues Eric Lesser and Michael DeMarco were instrumental in driving this work to completion.

18 months ago I shared with Tom Stewart the research we were doing and suggested that HBR readers might find it of interest. He put us in touch with Paul Hemp who was wonderful in helping take our research and helping us craft it into a piece worthy of publishing in HBR.

Today, a year and a half later, I see the article in glorious technicolor print in Houston. It has been a long journey, kinda like getting to level 70 in WoW, but we made it!

Thanks to all. Publishing in HBR truly is a collaborative, co-creative sport!

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3 Comments

  1. This is a great article — congratulations on it! I was delighted to see it in HBR esp — you couldn’t have a better business brand to endorse it.

    It does tend to raise generation gap issues — HBR’s readership seems to trend older, and I’ve had several people who read the article tell me that it left them nonplussed — it was so different from their own personal experience, they didn’t know how to respond to the article — whether to take it seriously, or to treat it just as some “trendy” piece that didn’t relate to their own workplace/business.

    There will be some interesting generation gap conflicts in the workplace going forward, as the under-30 fully-internet-enabled generation continues to migrate into companies which are being managed by older, less-internet-involved people.

    Reply
  1. Study: MMORPGs Critical in Developing Tomorrow’s Business Leaders « Educational Games Research
  2. On Learning in 3D « Learning Journal

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